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Airtightness of Buildings – Considerations regarding the Zero-Flow Pressure and the Weighted Line of Organic Correlation

This paper discusses two particular points of the buildings airtightness measurement method (ISO 9972) in relation with the calculation of the combined standard uncertainty: (1) the zero-flow pressure difference and (2) the weighted line of organic correlation.

Towards Real-Time Model-Based Monitoring and Adoptive Controlling of Indoor Thermal Comfort

Thermal comfort is an important aspect of the building design and indoor climate control as modern man spends most of the day indoors. Conventional indoor climate design and control approaches are based on static thermal comfort models that views the building occupants as passive recipients of their thermal environment. Assuming that people have relatively constant range of biological comfort requirements, and that the indoor environmental variables should be controlled to conform to that constant range.

A ‘use factor’ for HRV in intermittently heated dwellings

When considering the performance of HRV systems, the discussion is generally focusing on the reported effectiveness of the air-to-air heat exchanger. Although some excellent presentations at the AIVC conference in the past have dealt with uncertainties related to the test of that effectiveness, the fact that the heat recovered by the HRV unit might not be useful in an intermittently heated dwelling without room-by-room based demand control is usually not considered. Therefore, the ‘use-factor’ for the recovered heat is quantified in this paper.

TVOC concentrations measured in Belgium dwellings and their potential for DCV control

Over the last decade, TVOC sensors have been touted as an interesting alternative to CO2 and RH sensors in DCV systems. Nevertheless, there is little evidence on the nature and the profile of TVOC concentrations in modern dwellings.

Investigation of future ventilation flow rate requirements for dwellings in Belgium: from the application of FprEN16798-1:2016 to proposed robust rules

In the context of the PREVENT project, preparing a possible revision of the Belgian residential ventilation standard, the way of expressing ventilation requirements, among others in terms of ventilation flow rates, needs to be investigated. The aim of this paper is to propose and compare ways of expression of the ventilation requirements in terms of flow rates with respect to their robustness across dwellings.

The effectiveness of mechanical exhaust ventilation in dwellings

Ventilation systems play an important role in providing a good indoor air quality in dwellings. Mechanical exhaust ventilation systems implement natural vents to supply outdoor air to the dwelling. Natural driving forces, i.e. wind and thermal draught, influence the flow rates through these supply vents. Therefore, the flow rates depend on the weather conditions and vary in time. This study considers the influence of the wind and thermal draught on the operation of a mechanical exhaust ventilation system in a reference dwelling.

Component leakage: potential improvement graphs and classification of airpaths

Last years, interest in airtightness increases among all construction fields and airtightness becomes a major issue in the reduction of energy consumption in buildings. Nevertheless, there is a lack of understanding of air displacements through weak spots in buildings (airpaths). Firstly we develop first the concept of Potential Improvement Graph (PIG chart). These graphs represent the “improvement curves” of a given airpath (airflow indicator against airpath parameter). As an airpath can have multiple significant parameters, PIG charts can be n-dimension graphs.

Study of variants to classical mechanical exhaust ventilation systems by using mechanical exhaust in habitable rooms

Nowadays, due to the higher energy performance of dwellings, ventilation plays an increasing role in maintaining a good indoor comfort. Therefore new ventilation strategies in combination with demand controlled ventilation are needed to accomplish high energy-efficient ventilation (limiting ventilation losses and auxiliary energy consumption) while providing good indoor air quality, thermal and acoustic comfort.

Demand controlled ventilation in school and office buildings: lessons learnt from case studies

Demand controlled ventilation (DCV) refers to a ventilation system with air flow rates that are controlled based on a measurement of an indoor air quality (IAQ) and/or thermal comfort parameter. DCV operates at reduced air flow rates during a large amount of the operation time. Due to this decrease, less energy is needed for fan operation and heating/cooling the supply air. However, uncertainty still exists about the IAQ performance and ventilation efficiency in the room, especially at lower air flow rates.

REHVA Brussels Summit

The REHVA Brussels Summit will launch a new sequence of REHVA meetings offering an intense 2-days event with a new concept and a revamped visual design.

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