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The Reintroduction of Natural Ventilation to a 19th Century Opera House, Utilising Calibrated Computer Simulation and User Operation

The Royal Wanganui Opera House (RWOH), in Whanganui, New Zealand, was constructed in 1899, and now seats 830 people. This building was designed with a natural ventilation system; however, this system is no longer in operation and the RWOH has received regular complaints from patrons regarding indoor thermal comfort. Various options for mechanical systems to improve indoor comfort during summer performances have been considered, but have been deemed too costly. The RWOH is listed with Heritage New Zealand as a Category 1 heritage building.

Possible UK residential demand-controlled ventilation assessment methodology

Demand controlled ventilation (DCV) can improve the energy performance of all kinds of ventilation systems, in residential and non-residential buildings and is already part of the European Lot 6 and Ecodesign regulations and standards. However, the lack of recognition of DCV in SAP (Standard Assessment Procedure) forms a great barrier for the use of this technology in the UK. A methodology was developed to prove the guarantee on good IAQ, with potential saving on heating and auxiliary energy by modulating ventilation rates based on actual demand.

The influence of occupancy behaviour on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems regarding energy consumption and IAQ

It has already been proven that a large portion of the energy consumption gap between simulations and reality is due to the occupant behaviour in buildings. The improving airtightness of buildings makes that Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) can no longer rely on air renewal through infiltrations, bringing the need of ventilation systems. Within this frame, an ongoing dissertation focuses on the relationship between occupancy behaviour and ventilation systems in low energy buildings.

Study of variants to classical mechanical exhaust ventilation systems by using mechanical exhaust in habitable rooms

Nowadays, due to the higher energy performance of dwellings, ventilation plays an increasing role in maintaining a good indoor comfort. Therefore new ventilation strategies in combination with demand controlled ventilation are needed to accomplish high energy-efficient ventilation (limiting ventilation losses and auxiliary energy consumption) while providing good indoor air quality, thermal and acoustic comfort.

Effectiveness of Ventilative Cooling Strategies in Hot and Dry and Temperate Climates of India

Increasing use of air-conditioning in India is applying upward pressure on energy demand and may have implications on dependability. Electrical energy can be saved if favourable outdoor conditions are effectively utilized for cooling buildings with the minimum use of energy. This could be specifically applicable to residences where night-time use is more predominant for cooling by air conditioning systems but also aligns favourably with suitable outdoor conditions to be used as ventilative cooling.

Recommendable supply air rates for residential housing – A simulation study considering CO2 concentration, relative humidity, TVOC emissions and mould risk

In an extensive simulation study using a multi-zone airflow and contaminant transport calculation software (CONTAM) recommendations for the supply air rates for residential housing were derived as input for the revision of the Austrian standard ÖNORM H 6038 (2014). The floor plan, the occupancy and the contaminant and humidity sources are modelled to represent a typical Austrian housing situation. A humidity buffering model is also implemented. Based on common thresholds for CO2, relative humidity (r.h.) and TVOC the so-called relative threshold deviation is determined.

Numerical evaluation of the airtightness impact on airflow pattern in mechanically ventilated dwellings in France

The objective of this paper is to assess the impact of the envelope airtightness on airflow patterns for single detached dwellings depending on the ventilation system.

Simulation analysis for indoor temperature increase and reduction of heating load in the detached house with buoyancy ventilated wall in winter

Detached residential wooden houses are a common type of housing in Japan. Decay of wooden components within the walls is easily caused by condensation or defective flushing. To solve this problem, a double-skin system with a room-side air gap was developed. In this system, during winter, the airflow in the ventilated wall circulates freely around the whole house. Therefore, during daytime, the airflow moves solar heat to base, and releases heat to the house at night which can increase indoor temperature.

Numerical simulation of indoor air quality - mechanical ventilation system supplied periodically vs. natural ventilation

Building integrated renewable energy sources e.g. photovoltaic system is one of the promised solution for improving energy efficiency in building. However such kind of the system is restrained by irregular power supplied and necessity to convert current from direct to altering form. Therefore, very often the electrical energy generated by photovoltaic system cannot be effectively utilised to supply building devices, e.g. components of HVAC or lighting system.

System for controlling variable amount of air ensuring appropriate indoor air quality in low-energy and passive buildings

In low energy buildings and passive houses due to very low heating demands integrated heating and ventilation (VAV or DCV) systems are used to provide proper indoor climate conditions – thermal comfort and indoor air quality. Dynamic changes of indoor conditions result in permanent changes in air flow.

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