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Indoor Air Quality and Thermal Comfort, in Irish Retrofitted Energy Efficient Homes

Indoor air quality and thermal comfort was measured in 14 three-bedroom, semi-detached, cavity wall naturally-ventilated homes during the winter following an energy efficient retrofit. As part of the energy retrofit, homes received new windows and doors, an upgraded heating system, attic insulation, and wall vents, as well as pumped beaded wall insulation into three external walls.

A longitudinal field study of thermal comfort and air quality in naturally ventilated office buildings in UK

Natural ventilation has the potential to provide cooling and fresh air and cut 40% of the total energy consumption of European office buildings. While in the milder seasons natural ventilation is an obvious low-energy choice, if poorly designed it can cause overheating in summer and poor air quality in winter. In order to promote the use and design of naturally ventilated (NV) buildings, it is therefore important to understand how current NV buildings perform in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality.

Towards Real-Time Model-Based Monitoring and Adoptive Controlling of Indoor Thermal Comfort

Thermal comfort is an important aspect of the building design and indoor climate control as modern man spends most of the day indoors. Conventional indoor climate design and control approaches are based on static thermal comfort models that views the building occupants as passive recipients of their thermal environment. Assuming that people have relatively constant range of biological comfort requirements, and that the indoor environmental variables should be controlled to conform to that constant range.

Inter-model comparison of indoor overheating risk prediction for English dwellings

According to the 2016 Household Projections report, England’s housing stock could reach 28 million households by 2039 with approximately one fifth being new constructions. A significant proportion of these newly built dwellings may face a high risk of overheating as a result of the combined effects of climate change and more stringent building thermal efficiency standards, if not appropriately designed.

Impact assessment of natural ventilation on thermal comfort levels in sustainable residential buildings

In the present paper the impact of natural cross-ventilation on thermal comfort levels in sustainable residential buildings is evaluated. A sustainable dwelling is designed in Crete and various scenarios of different combinations of open windows and doors in the ground floor, the first floor and between the floors are tested to determine the final scenarios with the best possible airflow movement.

Evaluation of thermal comfort in an office building served by a liquid desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling air conditioning system

Recent studies examined a liquid desiccant indirect and direct evaporative cooling assisted 100% outdoor air system (LD-IDECOAS) as an energy conserving alternative to conventional air conditioning systems. An IDECOAS was introduced as an environmental-friendly air conditioning system that uses latent heat of water evaporation to cool the process air. Recently, studies suggested the integration of a liquid desiccant(LD) system with an IDECOAS to overcome a cooling reduction in evaporative cooling performance in a hot and humid climate.

Will naturally ventilated dwellings still be safe under heatwaves?

Heatwaves are often responsible for many deaths due to high temperature indoors. Energy savings is a key element in building design and refurbishment works to reduce the impact of climate change. Natural ventilation is often promoted as an indoor space cooling solution thanks to its energy saving potential.
The paper deals with prediction of heat-related health risks situations in naturally ventilated dwellings.

Indoor climate assessment of a classroom with mechanical ventilation and operable windows

Ventilation air may be provided in buildings by means of natural or mechanical strategies. When a HVAC system is installed, thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) may be controlled with higher precision. However, especially between the 70s and the 90s, mechanical ventilation systems have been installed on formerly naturally ventilated buildings without providing any control for natural ventilation.

Analysis of indoor air quality & thermal comfort parameters in building regulations in 8 member states

It is estimated that people spend 60-90% of their life in indoor environments. Therefore, it is obvious that indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort are of highly importance for the health and wellbeing of the population. Consequently, buildings should be designed to ensure proper indoor conditions. Furthermore, the need to mitigate climate change and to reduce energy import dependency, provides additional challenges for the design and operation of buildings and requires a dramatic reduction in their energy consumption and emissions.

Are women feeling colder than men in air-conditioning buildings?

Recently the international media like in USA, Canada, UK, Denmark, Germany etc. has been discussing the issue of differences between men and women regarding thermal comfort and the preferred room temperature. This presentation will discuss the issue of thermal comfort and the existing knowledge on the influence of gender, age, race, etc.

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