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ventilative cooling

International workshop on ventilative cooling

The workshop will be held on Monday October 23, 2017 at the BBRI offices (Boulevard Poincaré 79, 1060) in Brussels, Belgium.

The participants will present and discuss the outcomes of IEA-EBC Annex 62 “ventilative cooling” as well as future challenges and possibilities for international collaboration.

The workshop is an initiative of IEA-EBC annex 62 & venticool and is hosted by INIVE-BBRI & KU Leuven.

Participation to the workshop is free.

English

23 October 2017, International Workshop, Brussels, “Ventilative cooling”

The workshop will be held on Monday October 23, 2017 at the BBRI offices (Boulevard Poincaré 79, 1060) in Brussels, Belgium.

The participants will present and discuss the outcomes of IEA-EBC Annex 62 “ventilative cooling” as well as future challenges and possibilities for international collaboration.

The workshop is an initiative of IEA-EBC annex 62 & venticool and is hosted by INIVE-BBRI & KU Leuven.

Participation to the workshop is free.

English

VIP 35: Ventilative Cooling. State-of-the-art review executive summary

 

This report summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries.

Assessing ventilative cooling potential in Energy Performance regulations. Status and perspectives in Austria, Denmark, France

8 December, 2015 | Assessing ventilative cooling potential in Energy Performance regulations. Status and perspectives in Austria, Denmark, France

Ventilative cooling seminar on April 20, 2016, Cork

A half day seminar, organised by the Cork Institute of Technology in collaboration with IEA EBC Annex 62 – Ventilative Cooling, will be held on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM in Cork, Ireland.The event will present state of the art in utilising ventilation for reducing cooling energy demand and addressing the risk of overheating in low energy buildings.

English

20 April 2016, Seminar, Cork – Ventilative Cooling & Overheating Risk

Addressing the increased potential for cooling energy demand and associated risk of overheating in new and refurbished low energy buildings is becoming an important issue for the industry. This half day seminar for researchers, designers, engineers & architects, is organised by the Cork Institute of Technology in collaboration with IEA EBC Annex 62 – Ventilative Cooling and will present state of the art in utilising ventilation for reducing cooling energy demand and addressing the risk of overheating in low energy buildings.

English

Ventilative cooling potential and compliance in Energy Performance regulations — Status and perspectives in Belgium, Estonia, Greece

17 December 2015 | Ventilative cooling potential and compliance in Energy Performance regulations — Status and perspectives in Belgium, Estonia, Greece

Ventilative cooling—i.e., the use of natural or mechanical ventilation strategies to cool indoor spaces—can be very effective to reduce the cooling energy demand in buildings in summer or mid-season conditions. This webinar was part of a broader series focusing on ventilative cooling in energy performance, within the context of compliance with building regulations in several countries.

Automatic natural ventilation in large spaces: a passive ventilation technology for passive buildings

For zero and low energy buildings, high-energy efficiency ventilation is very often confused with a complex mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery. In school gymnasiums, where large volumes have to be ventilated, and where intermittent occupation is very usual, demand controlled natural ventilation has several advantages, making this technique very attractive. High stack height makes natural ventilation very efficient, limiting the necessary number and dimensions of windows.

Energy use consequences of ventilative cooling in a ZEB residential building

New buildings have to satisfy ever-tightening standards regarding energy efficiency and consumption. This results in higher insulation levels and lower air leakages that reduce heating demands. However, even at moderate outdoor temperatures these buildings are easily warmed up to such a degree that in order to ensure acceptable indoor environment quality, removal of excess heat becomes unavoidable. Use of electric energy related to mechanical cooling is considered incompatible with achieving zero energy buildings (ZEB).

Model Predictive Control (MPC) of hybrid ventilation systems in office buildings with dynamic glass facades

An advanced heat and electricity saving strategy for the regulation of hybrid ventilation systems with automatic night cooling (ventilative cooling), mechanical compressor cooling, natural ventilation and exterior solar shading by the inclusion of MPC (Model Predictive Control) has been developed in this project. The focus is on the optimization of the total energy cost (cost function) as compared to indoor climate requirements and variations in the outdoor climate. During the test period, the test persons could override the automatic control of the natural ventilation and solar shading.

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