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How the filtration of the incoming air decreases the particle concentration within a school equipped with a balanced ventilation system

To study the impact of the filtration efficiency level on the particle concentration in a rural school equipped with a balanced ventilation system with heat recovery, measurements of indoor and outdoor particle concentrations have been carried out by using three different efficiency filters. The tested filters are respectively classed G4, F7 and F9 according to NF EN 779 (2012).

Effect of building and installation design on PM2.5

People spend more than 80% of their time indoors. In contrast to ambient air, no (legal) limits for indoor particulate matter exist, although there are WHO guidelines. In the Netherlands a measurement protocol to determine the PM2.5 in office buildings has been developed including 5 quality classes. However at the moment no simple guidelines or models are available which can support the design and in-use phases to predict the PM2.5 concentration in office buildings and schools.

Simulated Influence of Indoor Climate and Ventilation on Schoolwork Performance in Estonian Manor Schools

Indoor temperature and humidity conditions as well as CO2 and airborne mould concentrations were measured in four manor schools in the Estonian cold climate. Based on these measurements, the influence of the indoor climate on the performance of schoolwork was assessed. The indoor environmental quality in manor schools turned out to be quite poor due to the inadequate performance of ventilation and heating systems. Intermittent stove heating was found to secure the minimum temperature in general but in winter thermal comfort was not always guaranteed.

Comparison of two ventilation control strategies in the first Norwegian school with passive house standard

The Marienlyst School is the first educational building in Norway built according to the passive house standard. This building benefits from a super-insulated and airtight envelope. While this reduces the heating demand largely, it also enhances the risk for poor indoor air quality and overheating compared to conventional buildings. It is therefore particularly important to implement an efficient ventilation strategy in order to avoid adverse effects on the health, well-being and productivity of the pupils.

Airtightness of office and educational buildings in Sweden – Measurements and analyses

The airtightness of office and educational buildings influences energy use and thermal comfort. A leaky building is likely to have a high use of energy and thermal discomfort. The knowledge of real airtightness levels of entire buildings and their impact on the energy use is very low, except for a study carried out in the USA. Therefore two different methods of airtightness testing were applied to six entire Swedish office and educational buildings built since 2000. The first method involves using the ventilation system of the building and the second one to use a number of blower doors.

Air Stuffiness and Air Exchange Rate in French Schools and Day-Care Centres

A pilot survey was undertaken from September 2009 to June 2011 in 310 schools and day-care centres distributed in all regions of France including overseas departments. This experimental survey was carried out as part of the preparation of the mandatory control of indoor air quality in public buildings. Three parameters were measured in 896 classrooms or child playrooms: benzene, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide (CO2). The last enables the determination of degree of air ‘stuffiness’ during children occupancy as well as the night-time air change rate.

Field Study Assessment of the Performance of Displacement Air Distribution in a Canadian School during the Heating Season

Stratified ventilation systems use a fundamentally different approach to supply heated or cooled air through a building than the ‘fully mixed and dilution’ ventilation systems found in the majority of non-residential buildings. Stratified air distribution creates a non-uniform environment in terms of temperature and pollutant distribution, and acceptable conditions in the occupied zone. Previous research has shown that this type of system works well for regions where buildings require year-round cooling.

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality in Classrooms Equipped with Cross-Flow Ventilation

In this work the evaluation of indoor air quality in a classroom equipped with cross-flow ventilation is presented. A numerical methodology, based on comparison with experimental data, used in the evaluation of the air exchange rate, airflow rate and the age of the air, was applied in the first phase of this work. The evolution of carbon dioxide inside spaces, with different airflow typologies, was then predicted in the second part. The study was based on a school located in the South of Portugal. In the experimental methodology the tracer gas decay method was applied.

A compilation of papers for the Indoor Air 2002 Conference in memory of Joan M. Daisey

This document compiles papers produced by staff and collaborators of the Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for presentation at the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, to be held June 30 – July 5, 2002 in Monterey, California. The Indoor Air Conference, held every three years, is the largest international conference on indoor air quality and was last held in the United States during 1981.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE VOC REMOVAL FILTER FOR CEILING CASSETTE TYPE AIR CONDITIONERS AND APPLICATION TO AN EDUCATIONAL FACILITY

The VOC removal filter for ceiling cassette type air conditioners was developed as a countermeasure against “sick school”. This paper illustrates basic performance of the developed filter, the detail of toluene removal examinations in an experiment room a

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